[Ch3] Bpoop Phaeh Saniwaat (Broadcast Thai) : Pope Thanawat / Bella Ranee

SuzieJ

sarNie OldFart
Give me a Five @Rosi4!! I have the same questions but am too shy to ask :BangHead::BangHead: Wonder how their nick names come about....
If "Pope" is his nick name, wonder which is his last name: Thanavat or Vatthanaputi.
There are also many spellings to Pope's name.... on google, you can find tanavat wattanaputi, tanawat, thanawat etc.... even if they sound similar, wonder which is the actual Thai spelling?
A lot of his Thai fans spell it thanavat
 

lamchieu

sarNie Adult
Joi on The Mask Line Thai:
See Joi at 33:00, he starts singing at 33:39.
I really like the second song he sings. Wish I knew the name :fighting3:

Of course the judges and audience love Joi, how could anyone NOT love him in all his adorableness???
Wow, he's impressive, can possibly success in singing if he ever get bored in acting. As far as my meager Thai can interpret, the second song is in Isan and because Most is from Isan so he can sing the language very well.
 

lamchieu

sarNie Adult
Give me a Five @Rosi4!! I have the same questions but am too shy to ask :BangHead::BangHead: Wonder how their nick names come about....
If "Pope" is his nick name, wonder which is his last name: Thanavat or Vatthanaputi.
There are also many spellings to Pope's name.... on google, you can find tanavat wattanaputi, tanawat, thanawat etc.... even if they sound similar, wonder which is the actual Thai spelling?
Thanavat is first and Vatthanaputi is last name. I think because Thai doesn't have letter V in their alphabet, so both V or W sounds the same as W. Whatever you write, his name will still sound Thanawat Wathanaputi. It's why the host in a show (which included Bell, Pope, Pun, Prang) joked about Bella and Weir product Vera, because even it written VERA, it's still pronounced Wera (the combination of Weir and Bella names)
Anyway, that's only my meager knowledge in Thai talking. I hope someone from Thai can clear this for us :thumbup::thumbup:
 

Rachfull

Pope's #1 Mia RAK
@Rachfull now that your Thai is in full swing (you can do the alphabets!!) & understand more of the Thai culture may I ask this maybe silly question - why are actors names such like - Pope, Great, Got, Pancake, Doughnut, Cherry, Fern, etc. I couldn't help smiling when I first started liking Thai movies. Is that what it's supposed to be like you name Tom, Dick & Harry or Brenda & Dolores? Or it's an intentional plan to sound cute? Because we have others with "normal" names like Bella, Pream, Mark, Mick, Weir, James.... It's not easy to find latest photos of Pope, you google "Pope" and THE POPE of Italy comes up.
I'm probably not the best person to ask this question because I'm not entirely certain either, so feel free anyone to jump in and correct me.
I'm pretty sure the nicknames are a cultural thing. I think part of it might have to do with the Thai language itself, seeing as Thai people refer to themselves and others by name more often than we do in English. Thai women, for example, refer to themselves by their own name instead of "chan" (I). That's a familiar way of speaking.
I think it's also because Thai names tend to be long, so people go by nicknames.
As for why THOSE particular nicknames, a lot of the same ones get used-- Noona, Lee, Ling, Aum, etc. I'm pretty certain the stars have the weirdest ones to help them stand out (think Barbra Streisand philosophy). Pope used to go by Na (for Thanawat), but changed to Pope when he got older. I don't know how common that nickname is, though.
And finally, why they are English words we would never name our children-- well, anything in another language sounds cool, right? English speakers steal names from other languages all the time.
Anyway, that's my theory. Sorry if I got it wrong, people who actually know the full answer.
 

Rachfull

Pope's #1 Mia RAK
Give me a Five @Rosi4!! I have the same questions but am too shy to ask :BangHead::BangHead: Wonder how their nick names come about....
If "Pope" is his nick name, wonder which is his last name: Thanavat or Vatthanaputi.
There are also many spellings to Pope's name.... on google, you can find tanavat wattanaputi, tanawat, thanawat etc.... even if they sound similar, wonder which is the actual Thai spelling?
Wattanaputi is Pope's last name. The reason there's so many different spellings is because it's a romanization of Thai letters (describing Thai characters using the English alphabet). For example, the character ต is sometimes romanized as the letter "t," but sometimes it is also romanized as "dt." It depends on who's doing the romanization. Another example would be ป, which can be romanized as either a "b," "bp," or "p."
The Thai spelling of Pope's name is โป๊ป (Pope) ธนวรรธน์ (Thanawat, his real first name) วรรธนะภูติ (Wattanaputi, his last name).
 
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Rachfull

Pope's #1 Mia RAK
Wow, he's impressive, can possibly success in singing if he ever get bored in acting. As far as my meager Thai can interpret, the second song is in Isan and because Most is from Isan so he can sing the language very well.
He posted a clip of the song on his IG and captioned it "Laos," which makes me wonder if the song was Laotian or about Laos or Laos-inspired or something?
 

Rachfull

Pope's #1 Mia RAK
Thanavat is first and Vatthanaputi is last name. I think because Thai doesn't have letter V in their alphabet, so both V or W sounds the same as W. Whatever you write, his name will still sound Thanawat Wathanaputi. It's why the host in a show (which included Bell, Pope, Pun, Prang) joked about Bella and Weir product Vera, because even it written VERA, it's still pronounced Wera (the combination of Weir and Bella names)
Anyway, that's only my meager knowledge in Thai talking. I hope someone from Thai can clear this for us :thumbup::thumbup:
There is no letter for "v" in Thai. In fact, "v" doesn't exist in a lot of Asian languages, at least that I know of. Because Asians have no "v" sound, they often replace it with a sound they do have-- w. It's mostly another "who's doing the romanization" problem.

My mom taught English in Japan, and she said she had to show the students exactly how we make the v sound because they just couldn't figure it out. She said a lot of their confusion came from Japanese sounds always being made in the back of the throat, so biting your lip to make a sound was unheard of for the students.

It's the same way with r and l, those two letters are interchangeable in many Asian languages (even though Thai has ร (r) and ล (l), which is why they occasionally confuse r's and l's when speaking English.
Hope that makes sense.

When I speak Thai, it's very difficult for me to make the อื (closest romanization would be "eu") sound, because it simply doesn't exist in English. So I do my best with it, but I can't pronounce it perfectly because I just don't know how to make that sound. So it's a universal idea.
 
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