Ideas on how to mix a Hmong wedding and an American wedding

Discussion in 'Hmong' started by Thao-Byrd, May 7, 2012.

  1. Thao-Byrd

    Thao-Byrd sarNie Egg

    I'm Caucasian, my fiance is Hmong

    We're wanting to get married, and I have done a lot of research and read a lot of informative blogs to learn more about his culture (which I LOVE) and I have decided I want to mix Hmong wedding traditions with an American wedding... I'm just not sure how to blend them...

    Any suggestions?

    I'm already working on the wedding dress (the easiest part, of course), and have a design already drawn up.
     
  2. mongstaness

    mongstaness sarNie Adult

    ooooh show us the design if possible! i'd love to see how it turns out.
     
  3. Thao-Byrd

    Thao-Byrd sarNie Egg

    Hopefully my design doesn't offend, lol.

    It'll largley be made out of silk, and it's knee length (I'm not big on long dresses), and it's just the basic design, not very detailed or completely finished. This is just the dress, no jewelry or anything. The rope around the waist is royal blue, and the fabric down the center of the sev is royal blue as well, the fabric that goes around the royal blue on the sev... I already have that lol, it's gold with dragons and phoenixes, I just havent had the time to get it and take a photo of it.

    http://i927.photobucket.com/albums/ad115/MercuricxAngel/weddingdress.jpg
     
  4. population1

    population1 sarNie Egg

    You want to blend both traditions? There can/are many things possible to make a super blend wedding between both traditions. It's all up to both of you personally, but I would suggest you are starting out with the wrong color(s) in your design.
     
  5. Thao-Byrd

    Thao-Byrd sarNie Egg

    Explain about the dress, because nobody really tells me anything and the three people I have shown (fiance, fiance's sister, and bff) all told me they thought it was great? Aaaaaaand, he doesn't want to help me lol If he did I wouldn't have to ask. He said the wedding is all my thing, just tell him when and where; I had to go on the internet to learn what I do know about hmong weddings, because he won't tell me anything! Lol
     
  6. chouakim

    chouakim TTFC♥

    Colors and fabric play the largest role in Hmong clothes. You have a good start and its simple, perhaps you can add colors that would normally be seen on traditional Hmong clothes, (that purple on the hat, the bright green and pink on the slash, etc.)
     
  7. stephanie

    stephanie sarNie Adult

    My brother in law had a mix wedding. They wore Hmong clothes and had the American wedding. I too had a mix wedding, but mine was a bit more traditional. We had the Hmong ceremony then the American wedding the next day (bad idea unless it's planned in advance) lol
     
  8. moonfaerrie

    moonfaerrie sarNie Hatchling

    I wanted to do mine as below:

    Negotiation on Friday in Hmong clothes.

    The actual feast will be on Saturday along with the party. Cater most food and boil some chicken and plain veggies for the elders.

    Walk down the aisle, say vows, khi tes. Dinner, speeches and then dancing.

    But of course, things might not work out that way if the negotiating doesnt go as planned and take too long or people get too drunk or too tired. So will do them on separate dates so there will be less complications.
     
  9. population1

    population1 sarNie Egg

    kinda late on the reply, but a late one is better than none, so as to the Hmong saying in accordance with Hmong times, reluctant of demands, that is. colors are of nature which are of correspondence to culture, tradition, the like... the poster, after you, has mentioned some good ones. particularily, blue isn't a common, or should I say, predominant color of 'abstract' value, not even that of the 'concrete' value. although, there are very little expressions or uses with the color blue here and there in Hmong traditional clothing/styles just because of the array of colors to ferment; which then are thrown over sexual identity such as those found most notably in Hmong male post-traditional clothings. however; originally, and historically or the like, blue is seldom a representation of Hmong 'flourishness' such as with purple, pink, green, and red... anatomically scaling to fit the natural filaments in Hmong customs.

    what can a spider weave without silk?
    what is a leaf, then..?
     

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